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WxWidgets
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WxWidgets

wxWidgets (formerly known as wxWindows), is an open source cross-platform GUI framework. Bindings are available for many commonly used programming languages:

wxWidgets enables a program to compile and run on several computer platforms with only minimal code changes. It is set apart from other such libraries not only by its extensive coverage of functionality (graphics, network, etc.), but also by its ability to use "native" widgets and, if needed, emulate foreign ones, giving the resulting program the look and feel of the platform it runs on.

wxWidgets was started in 1992 by Julian Smart. It covers systems like Windows, Apple Macintosh, Linux/Unix (for X11, Motif, and GTK), OpenVMS, and OS/2. An embedded version is being worked on.

Table of contents
1 How it Works
2 Name change from wxWindows to wxWidgets
3 External links

How it Works

wxWidgets is best described as a native toolkit. Instead of emulating the display of widgets using graphic primitives on the different supported platforms, wxWidgets provides a thin abstraction to the native widgets. In other words, the underlying wxWidgets code prefers calling a native widget on the platform (refer to SWT/Eclipse/Java), instead of reimplementing custom widgets. This leads to a faster, more native looking interface when compared to toolkits like Swing (for Java).

wxWidgets is not just designed to display GUIs. It also has a built in ODBC based database library, an Interprocess Communication layer, socket networking functionality, and more.

Name change from wxWindows to wxWidgets

On February 20th, 2004, the developers of wxWindows announced that the project was changing its name to wxWidgets, as a result of discussions between Julian Smart and Microsoft regarding Microsoft's United Kingdom trademark of the term Windows.

External links