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Tatar language
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Tatar language

Tatar (Tatar tele/Tatarça)
Spoken in: Idel-Ural, Ukraine, Turkey, China, Finland, ex-USSR
Region: Eastern Europe, Central Asia
Total speakers: 8 million
Ranking: 95
Genetic classification: Altaic languages:Turkic languages::Northwestern (Qypchaq-Bolghar):::Uralian::::Tatar
Official status
Official language of: Tatarstan
Regulated by: valign="top"
Language codes
ISO 639-1 tt
ISO 639-2 tat
SIL TTR

The Tatar language or Tatar language (Tatar tele, Tatarça) is a very ancient Turkic language and belongs to the Altaic branch of the Ural-Altaic family of languages.

It is the official language of the Republic of Tatarstan, and is also spoken in Siberia as well as in China, Turkey, Ukraine and all over Central Asia.

With a few exceptions, the main features which distinguish the Altaic languages from Indo-European are as follows:

Kazan Tatar language's ancestors are extinct Bolgar and Kipchak languages.

Other European, Caucasus and West Siberian Tatar languages are very similar to the Kazan Tatar language and are mutually intelligible with it.

The literary Tatar language is based on the Kazan Tatar language's Middle (Tatarstan) dialect and the Old Tatar Language (İske Tatar Tele). Old Tatar language's ancestor is Volga Bolgar language and partly Kipchak.

Kazan Tatar language is also native for 400,000 Bashkirs (especially living in Ufa) and some thousands Maris. Tatar language is an international communication language beetwen Tatars, Bashkirs, Chuvashs, Kazakhs and some Maris.

Table of contents
1 Difficulties of Tatar pronunciation
2 See also
3 External links

Difficulties of Tatar pronunciation

tekst (text) -> [tekest] bank -> [banık] (not [bañk])

b -> [p], g ->[k], ğ -> [q] or [x], v ->[f] tabíb (doctor) -> [tabíp]

See also

External links

Language Studies

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History and Literature

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