Encyclopedia  |   World Factbook  |   World Flags  |   Reference Tables  |   List of Lists     
   Academic Disciplines  |   Historical Timeline  |   Themed Timelines  |   Biographies  |   How-Tos     
Sponsor by The Tattoo Collection
Starch
Main Page | See live article | Alphabetical index

Starch

Starch is a complex carbohydrate which is insoluble in water. Starch (in particular cornstarch) is used in cooking for thickening sauces. In industry, it is used in the manufacture of adhesives, paper, and textiles

Table of contents
1 Biochemistry
2 Household
3 Livestock
4 See also
5 External links

Biochemistry

In biochemistry, starch is a mix of two polymeric carbohydrates (polysaccharides) called amylose and amylopectin, in which the monomers are glucose units joined to one another head-to-tail. The overall structure of amylopectine is not, however, simply a linear polysaccharide chain, since occasionally, two glucose units are joined to one, forming a branch point.

Starch is often found in the fruit, seeds, or tuberss of plants. Examples include cornstarch, which is extracted from corn, potatoes, wheat, and rice.

Household

Clothing starch or laundry starch is a liquid that is prepared by mixing a vegetable starch in water (earlier preparations also had to be boiled), and is used in the laundering of clothes. During the 19th century and early 20th century, it was stylish to stiffen the collars and sleeves of men's shirts and the ruffles of girls' petticoats by applying starch to them as the clean clothes were being ironed.

Aside from the smooth, crisp edges it gave to clothing, it served a practical purpose as well. Dirt and sweat from a man's neck and wrists would stick to the starch rather than fibers of the clothing, and would easily wash away along with the starch. Then, after each laundering, the starch would be reapplied.

Livestock

Animal starch is the common name of glycogen. It is not the same as ordinary starch.

See also

External links