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2000 Summer Olympics
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2000 Summer Olympics

Alternative meaning: 2000 Summer Paralympics

The Games of the XXVII Olympiad were held in 2000 in Sydney, Australia. Sydney was elected in 1993 above Beijing, Berlin, Istanbul and Manchester.

Games of the XXVII Olympiad
Nations participating199
Athletes participating10,651 (6,582 men, 4,069 women)
Events300 in 28 sports
Opening ceremoniesSeptember 15, 2000
Closing ceremoniesOctober 1, 2000
Officially opened byWilliam Deane
Athlete's OathRechelle Hawkes
Judge's OathPeter Kerr
Olympic TorchCathy Freeman

Table of contents
1 Highlights
2 Medals awarded
3 Medal count
4 Media coverage
5 References

Highlights

Prologue

Although the Opening Ceremony was not scheduled until September 15, the football competitions already began on September 13, with the first preliminary matches

Day 1 - September 15

In a long opening cermony, Australia presented itself and its celebrities to the world, with about 3,000 million watching the show. They saw a record 199 nations enter the stadium, the only missing IOC member being the suspended Afghanistan. Most remarkable was the entering of North and South Korea as one team, using a specially designed flag. The two teams would compete separately, however. Four athletes from East Timor also marched in the parade of nations. Although the country-to-be had no National Olympic Committee yet, they were allowed to compete under the Olympic Flag. The Governor-General, Sir William Deane, opened the games.

The ceremonies concluded with the lighting of the Olympic Flame. Former Australian Olympic champions brought the torch through the stadium, handing it over to Cathy Freeman, who lit the flame in the cauldron. A hot favourite for the 400 m title, Freeman is a major role model for Aborigines in Australia.

Day 2 - September 16

The first medals of the Games were awarded in the women's air rifle shooting event, which was won by Nancy Johnson of the United States.

Triathlon made its Olympic debut with the women's race. Set in the surroundings of the Sydney Opera House, Brigitte McMahon of Switzerland swam, cycled and ran to the first gold medal in the sport, beating the favoured home athletes.

The first star of the Games was Ian Thorpe. The 17-year-old Australian first set a new World Record in the 400 m freestyle final before competing in an exciting 4 x 100 m freestyle final. Swimming the last leg, Thorpe passed the leading Americans and arrived in a new World Record time, two tenths of a second ahead of the Americans. In the same event for women, the Americans also broke World Record, finishing ahead of the Netherlands and Sweden.

IOC president Juan Antonio Samaranch, at his last Olympics, had to leave for home, as his wife was severely ill. Upon arrival, his wife had already passed away. Samaranch returned to Sydney four days later.

Day 3 - September 17

Canadian Simon Whitfield sprinted away in the last 100 m of the men's triathlon, becoming the inaugural winner in the event.

On the cycling track, Robert Bartko beated fellow German Jens Lehmann in the individual pursuit, setting a new Olympic Record. Leontien Zijlaard-van Moorsel set a World Record in the semi-finals the same event for women.

In the swimming pool, American Tom Dolan beat the World record in the 400 m medley, successfully defending the title he won in Atlanta four years prior. Dutchwoman Inge de Bruijn also clocked a new World Record, beating her own time in the 100 m butterfly final to win by more than a second.

Day 4 - September 18

The main event for the Australians on the fourth day of the Games was the 200 m freestyle. Dutchman Pieter van den Hoogenband had broken the World Record in the semi-finals, taking it from the new Australian hero Ian Thorpe, who came close to the World Record in his semi-final heat. As the final race finished, Van den Hoogenband's time was exactly the same as in the semi-finals, finishing ahead of Thorpe by only half a second.

China wins the gold medal in the men's team all-around gymnastics competition, after being the runner-up in the previous two Olympics. The other medals are taken by Ukraine and Russia, respectively.

Zijlaard-van Moorsel lived up to the expectations set by her world record in cycling in the semis by winning the gold medal. The title completed her return to the sport after a long leave because of anorexia.

Day 9 - September 23

By rowing in the winning coxed four, Steve Redgrave of Great Britain became a member of a select group who had won gold medals at five consecutive Olympics.

Medals awarded

See the medal winners, ordered by sport:

Medal count

PosCountryGoldSilverBronzeTotalpeople/medal
1United States402433972,993,000
2Russia322828881,642,000
3China2816155921,813,000
4Australia16251758340,000
5Germany131726561,471,000
6France131411381,584,000
7Italy13813341,706,000
8Netherlands129425646,000
9Cuba1111729388,000
10United Kingdom11107282,146,000
11Romania116825891,000
12South Korea81010281,725,000
13Hungary86317591,000
14Poland653142,759,000
15Japan585187,067,000
16Bulgaria56213580,000
17Greece46313820,000
18Sweden45312740,000
19Norway43310455,000
20Ethiopia41388,320,000
21Ukraine31010232,089,000
22Kazakhstan34072,395,000
23Belarus331117607,000
24Canada338142,301,000
25Spain335113,656,000
26Turkey302513,622,000
27Iran301417,070,000
28Czech Republic23381,281,000
29Kenya23274,520,000
30Denmark2316897,000
31Finland21141,298,000
32Austria21032,729,000
33Lithuania2035719,000
34Azerbaijan20132,610,000
35Slovenia2002968,000
36Switzerland1629813,000
37Indonesia132639,149,000
38Slovakia13151,086,000
39Mexico123617,485,000
40Algeria11356,564,000
41Uzbekistan11246,495,000
42Latvia1113783,000
42Yugoslavia1113
44Bahamas1102
45New Zealand1034
46Estonia1023
46Thailand1023
48Croatia1012
49Cameroon1001
49Colombia1001
49Mozambique1001
52Brazil06612
53Jamaica0437
54Nigeria0303
55Belgium0235
55South Africa0235
57Argentina0224
58Morocco0145
58Chinese Taipei (Taiwan)0145
60North Korea0134
61Moldova0112
61Trinidad and Tobago0112
61Saudi Arabia0112
64Ireland0101
64Uruguay0101
64Vietnam0101
67Georgia0066
68Portugal0022
68Costa Rica0022
70Armenia0011
70Barbados0011
70Chile0011
70Iceland0011
70India0011
70Israel0011
70Kuwait0011
70Kyrgyzstan0011
70Former Yugoslav
Republic of Macedonia
0011
70Qatar0011
70Sri Lanka0011

Media coverage

The games were covered by the following broadcasters:

One of the more notable parts of the media coverage of the games was the two-hour nightly broadcast of The Dream, a comedy talk show discussing the days events, presented by Australian comedic duo Roy and HG. The show was broadcast internationally, and featured a wombat mascot, (named Fatso the Fat-Arsed Wombat), who became significantly more popular than the official mascots Syd, Ollie and Millie. Their commentary on the mens gymnastics was also entertaining.

Running up to the games, a lesser known Australian comedy satire The Games was broadcast in Australia only. It featured a spoof of the issues and events that the top-level organisers and bureaucrats suffered in the lead up to the games.

References

Internal links

External links

Bibliography


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